Stalled traffic: Exchange rate among reasons keeping Canadians...

"I haven't been back in years," he said. Observers of Canadian travel and tourism have traditionally blamed an unfavorable exchange rate for keeping Canadians like Hagenlocher home. Since 2014, the number of noncommercial automobiles entering the U.S. has fallen by 25 percent while the value of the Canadian dollar has hovered around 76 U.S. cents since 2013. But experts say it seems there's more keeping Canadians away than just economics. "It's a really complicated issue," said David Flynn, c

Perfectly pickled: Grand Forks man peddles peculiar treat

The next thing he knew, he had more than 70 notifications. Bugliosi had been making pickled asparagus and other pickled treats at home for about a decade. But after that post, Bugliosi decided to sell them commercially. His pickled products can now be found in Happy Harry's stores and in the Bloody Marys and Caesars served at Rhombus Guys. "People that know my family have had them before and love them," Bugliosi said. "But a lot of other people are like 'oh, what is that?'"

Red River Valley towns prepare for predicted flooding

The driver, Ryan Woinarowicz, farms on the other side of the river in Minnesota. "At some point, Highway 220 will go under and he'll have to take the boat over to town," Olson said. These are normal springtime activities in Drayton and much of the Red River Valley as communities along the river prepare for flooding. At 32 feet, the Red River at Drayton is considered in "flood stage." There is a 90 percent chance the river will rise to 38 feet, which would be a "moderate" flood for the area.

'I love being Polish'

"This is the best sausage we've made yet," one of them remarks. The Polish National Alliance held its 14th annual festival in the Minto Community Center on Saturday. Nearly 600 people turned up to eat and celebrate, some coming from as far as Milwaukee. Jeff Jankowski, who came all the way from Wisconsin, said this was his second Polish Food Fest. "We introduced them to Polish chili last year," Jankowski said. "We're serving it this year too."

Looking 'Forward': 20 by 20 program in Devils Lake hopes to keep...

"We're trying to stop the bleeding of our high school youth," said Brad Barth, executive director of the Forward Devils Lake Corporation. Barth has been working to recruit high school seniors and match them with local employers. The Forward Devils Lake Corporation and the business with which a student is partnered will reimburse 80 percent of tuition costs, fees and room and board. Forward Devils Lake will pay 20 percent and the business will pay 60 percent.

On hold: Minnesota communities disappointed after pipeline d...

Mikey Totleben is the owner of the motel. He said he caters to construction workers and was depending on the work on the pipeline coming through town this summer. Totleben, who also is a Hallock city councilman, said he's feeling a little let down that construction on the pipeline has been delayed. Enbridge announced earlier this month that construction of its Line 3 oil pipeline will be delayed until the second half of next year, leaving local communities like Hallock disappointed.

Zap will celebrate 50th anniversary of Zip to Zap

It was first joked about in the North Dakota State University’s student newspaper, The Spectrum. It started gaining traction and eventually a story was published inviting college students from all over the country to Zap, written by Kevin Carvell, now 73, and the editor of The Spectrum in 1969. Now, 74, Don Homuth was the editor of The Spectrum during Zip to Zap, when Carvell was taking a break from school. Carvell wrote the tongue-in-cheek article and then left school, leaving Homuth fielding

A growing gap: With downturn in retail and ag, businesses gear...

The manufacturing sector remains strong in Grand Forks, but the city is lagging behind the rest of the state in certain economic categories, like job growth, gross domestic product and sales-tax revenue. Meanwhile, North Dakota as a whole is seeing an upward trend in those categories. "Grand Forks is clearly growing," said Dave Flynn, chair of the UND economics department, "but there is a gap and that gap is increasing." The issue with Grand Forks is twofold: Although certain sectors are growi

Grand changes: Owners of Grand Cities Mall hope to revitalize...

Land of Hope LLC has hired California-based Plainjoe Studios to create a master plan for the part of town board member Paul Knight hopes will become known as the "Midtown District." Knight, also lead pastor at Hope Church in the Grand Cities Mall, said shoppers today are driven by experiences and not just wanting to pick up a product. Knight likens the change in the retail market to the invention of the car. When Henry Ford invented a car almost anyone could afford, it put people selling horse

Fertile is 'more than Minnesota nice,' residents say

"Welcome to Fertile." A sign faded by harsh Minnesota winters greets those just passing through and those who may decide to stay awhile. Becca Opdahl and her husband both grew up in Fertile and moved away. "When I left, I never wanted to come back," Opdahl said. But after going to school in the cities and living in St. Paul, Opdahl and her husband decided to come back home to raise their family. Opdahl now runs Opdahl's Donuts in Fertile.

Grand Forks' full-service gas stations offer glimpse of the ...

Even when it is biting cold, Brian and his brother Darin Gilbertson are out in the elements, pumping gas or filling tires with air. The kind of services they offer are reminiscent of long ago, when every gas station was full service. Today, Bob's Oil in Grand Forks doesn't exactly fit in with the other businesses on Gateway Drive. Along the modern four-lane road, Bob's twinkling "gas" sign sticks out like a classic car in a lot of Teslas.
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